Lumino The Dentists

Lumino the Dentists

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Welcome to Lumino Auckland Central

(Formerly Proudmouth)


Call us today (09) 373 4962  Book Online We are open Mon - Thurs: 7am-8pm, Fri: 7am-5pm, Sat: 8am-4pm (Alternate Saturday's)

FAQ's

Need more information?

If you have a question try our FAQ's below or otherwise drop us a line on 0800 776 831

1.Will any treatment hurt?
2.What do hygienists do?
3.What causes bad breath?
4.Should I brush my gums?
5.Are you ever too old to get braces?
6.Should I use floss, brush and mouthwash, or is one or two of these sufficient?
7.Should I have my amalgam fillings replaced?
8.Why do my gums bleed sometimes?
9.The enamel has come off my front teeth and the dentin is showing (plus my teeth are feeling sensitive) – is that bad?
10.Why do your Wisdom teeth usually have to be removed?


1.Will any treatment hurt?
No, not any more! With ultra high-speed drills, latest fine injection technology and pre-surface anaesthetics no treatment, however major, should result in anything but a few seconds of mild discomfort. If you are one of the many who hold a deep-seated fear of 'the dentist' make it clear when you arrive and the dentist will fully explain all your options.

2.What do hygienists do?
Hygienists are fully trained dental health professionals. They are essentially ancillaries to your dentist in a mainly preventative-care role. Their three main functions are: evaluation of gum health, scaling and polishing, teaching one-on-one cleaning techniques for maximum oral hygiene. Other treatments can include fissure or groove scaling, whitening systems and custom-made sports mouthguards.

3.What causes bad breath?
In nearly all cases the dreaded 'halitosis' is the result of minute food particles trapped between teeth or just under the gum line. These decompose, form bacteria and then that sulphurous odour. Regular visits to your hygienist, more frequent, meticulous brushing and flossing will usually eliminate the problem unless there is an infection in the gums or a tooth.

4.Should I brush my gums?
Yes, but in a specific, safe way. Brushing at the gum line improperly can cause the gums to recede. When this happens, the teeth become sensitive, especially to cold drinks.
The best way to remove the plaque at the gum line is to slant the toothbrush head on a 45-degree angle to the tooth. This means that when you’re brushing the lower teeth, the bristles are slanted downwards, and for the top teeth, the bristles are slanted upwards. Use a short, gentle stroke that "wiggles" the bristles at the gum line. This technique effectively removes the plaque and should not traumatize the gums.
Think about it…when you do it this way, you’re essentially only removing the plaque from one or two teeth at a time, not a large group of them. After finishing one area, move on to other teeth, until all - outside and inside - teeth have been cleaned. Though cumbersome and slow at first, this plaque-removal technique can skilfully be performed in very little time. It is also a good idea to occasionally brush your cheeks, roof of your mouth, and tongue, for a fresher breath.

5.Are you ever too old to get braces?
No. Because healthy teeth can be moved at any age, an orthodontist can improve the smile of practically anyone-in fact, orthodontists regularly treat patients in their 50s, 60s and older! However, teeth do tend to move a little more slowly the older people which means any treatment will very likely take longer.

6.Should I use floss, brush and mouthwash, or is one or two of these sufficient?
Thorough brushing and flossing combined is the most effective way to control plaque.

7.Should I have my amalgam fillings replaced?
Yes, if you want to look good. The new composites can be colour matched to provide an almost invisible filling. Unlike amalgam they actually bond onto the surrounding tooth enamel giving a much better seal and achieve a load-bearing strength on hard working back teeth comparable to your original healthy tooth.

8.Why do my gums bleed sometimes?
Most likely this is a sign of developing gum disease or gingivitis. Initially caused by plaque build up the gums become inflamed and recede slightly from the tooth surface allowing bacteria to flourish in the tiny gaps. If not treated the condition becomes irreversible and can result in multiple extraction. Sometimes bleeding gums are simply caused by abrasion - a worn toothbrush applied too vigorously is the usual culprit. Remember to replace your brush or electric head every 10 - 12 weeks.

9.The enamel has come off my front teeth and the dentin is showing (plus my teeth are feeling sensitive) – is that bad?
Yes, dentine is very soft, readily stains, and wears easily from the abrasive compounds in toothpaste. Sensitivity shows that fresh dentine is being exposed due to more abrasion, acid from bacteria in plaque, or highly acidic food and drink. It is advisable that you seek dental advice as soon as possible as change of diet or oral care habits may be needed. In most cases restorative treatment will be required to replace the lost tissue and prevent further wear.

10.Why do your Wisdom teeth usually have to be removed?
Your 4 wisdom teeth usually appear after your jaw is fully developed (17 - 21 years), overcrowding occurs causing damage to the next tooth. They become impacted and painful. Early symptoms may include frequent headaches, sore throats, earache or swollen glands. We recommend a panoramic X-ray at about 18 - 20 yrs so your dentist can pre-evaluate your situation. For most of us - up to 90% - they must come out.

Please note: the range of services and related fees may differ between practices.